Disaster! Kind of

No, not a world, or even national disaster

Progress after the disaster. Find the broken warp.

This is my personal weaving disaster. I sat on my loom bench yesterday, only to discover a broken warp, and upon further examination, I discovered several frayed ones. Since I was really not willing to lose all the work on this piece, I slept on it before making a decision about what to do. I decided to weave to the farthest point in the weaving, hand beating rather than using the loom beater, then to advance the warp way past the problem and start the weaving again. Maybe I’ll end up with a triptych. Or not. An experiment of sorts.

Warp advanced past the problem

Listening and weaving

In this picture, you can see that the first section has been completed, and the warp advanced. Another piece has begun with waste yarn. Next step, some knots, a few shots of warp, some soumak, and the weaving begins. On the cartoon below, you can see where first section ends.

Stopped the first piece at the red arrow

While all of this weaving is going on, I am listening to Burying the Honeysuckle Girls. While listening, I am reminded of a book I read years ago called One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd, a period piece.

Many details have flown from my memory, but someone came up with a plan to give 1000 white women to the Indians to appease them and perhaps stop the many battles. But where to get the women? From the insane asylums, of course.

This was during a period of history when the men (husbands or fathers or brothers) could commit women family members to an institution when those women did things that didn’t suit the men. Like not marry someone, or do something embarrassing, or … whatever.

The women were chosen for this project, and because of how women were committed, some were not actually insane. And the tale goes on from there telling the story of one particular woman, through her journals. Those journals are so realistic that I had to remind myself that they are fiction.

Back to the Honeysuckle Girls

This story switches back and forth from present day and the thirties. The setting for the thirties is in a rural area of the mountains in Alabama, where men would still commit their women when they displeased them. The present day setting is in Birmingham, Alabama, where the main character is trying to save herself by finding what happened to her ancestors. At first I wasn’t sure the girls were going to hold my attention, but as it progressed, it does.

Read any good books lately?

2 thoughts on “Disaster! Kind of

  1. Susan Waters

    This problem solving you shared is so good- shows the art of working through an unexpected challenge which is one of the things that makes textile arts, tapestry in particular so intriguing. One never needs to worry about getting static! Also the valuable lesson of ‘sleeping on a problem’ Clarity, solutions do come through after a good night’s sleep. I’ve been known for the radical, cut it off the loom then later look at the piece and wonder if it really was that bad or un-salvageable. It will be fun to see your final project.

    Reply
  2. Sherri Post author

    You are so kind to say this! I sometimes feel I’m really just sharing my dirty laundry, but on the other hand, the internet is so good for just this kind of sharing. Never would a tapestry bobbin before? Look it up! (I just did)

    I still don’t know if I’m going to be happy with this when I finish, but I am going to try and find a way to salvage it.

    By the way, I’ve had a few of those cut-it-off-the-loom and think later projects. Frustration at its best!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *