Tag Archives: slits

Moving along

Some pictures today… I’ve noticed that the pictures are going up on Facebook and not here. Plus, frankly, there’s just not a lot to write about. It’s cold, and I’m already tired of cold weather. On cold days, my time goes like this:

  • To the studio
  • Start a fire
  • Weave
  • Haul in more wood
  • Stoke the fire
  • Weave
  • Repeat as needed

The weaving–I’m weaving two small pieces on the big loom. They are in the neighborhood of 16 inches wide, and the intent is for them to be more or less square. I was having fun weaving one of the pieces and got to the place where the warp needed to be advanced. That means it’s time to work on the other piece. With both of these I am doing something different, at least for me. Untitled-4

Detail

Detail

 

 

 

When I posted the above pictures, I asked if anyone could tell what it is. Untitled-1 The next pic is below.  Yep, here it is in all its glory. You may notice a lot of big slits. I don’t do slits. In theory, I know how to sew them together, but since I don’t do slits, well, you can see where this is going. And that “hair?” That’s what is in the detail above. That’s going to be everywhere, like Little Orphan Annie. Except more colorful.

And this may be the last picture seen of this project, depending on how those slits go. No matter, at least a something that’s been in my sketchbook for a really long time will have been attempted.

 

To slit or not to slit

Designs that require slits are to be avoided. And I usually do avoid them, but in a weak moment I started weaving a design when I really knew better. I’ve been sewing them up as I go along, but frankly, I just don’t like the way they look. To make sure I was doing them correctly, I did a small search.

ATA has a very good article by Susan Maffei about slits. Other links led me to articles or pictures were not so informative.

So while weaving, I have been thinking about these angles that end up in slits and a few other types of weaving I want to do. I’m thinking I really need to warp up that baby loom and get to experimenting.

To take a break from slits, I came across this from a publication called My San Antonio. The artist is Anita Valencia, who titled her installation “Sun She Rise Sun She Set and You Ain’t Seen Texas Yet”.