Tag Archives: value

More squares

Squares, ©Sherri Coffey

Squares, ©Sherri Coffey

Here’s what I cut off from that horrible warp that I wrote about here. The warp doesn’t seem to affect the finished product, though.

I like the design except for one thing– the first group of diagonal squares on the right is the wrong color. That particular blue is too close in value to the background and becomes hidden. I’ve written about value before here. It’s often a problem of mine.

What could the title for this piece be? Hiding in Plain Sight? For now it’s just Squares.

Filters

Tangled skeins are what I’m dealing with

In the process of prepping the skeins for dyeing, they were soaked in the washer with Synthropol. When it came time to actually do the dyeing, I turned the dial to spin, or at least I thought I did. It took me a few minutes to realize that the washer sounded all wrong. Turns out that I had moved the dial to rinse and these yarns were being agitated. And oh what a mess of tangled yarns.

Tangled

Tangled mess

While balling up many tangled skeins of yarn–and tangled yarns take a really long time to ball–I suddenly realized that I could demonstrate the red and green filters.

Magenta-Yarns-2

Magenta-ish yarns

Magenta-red-filter.

Magenta yarns with red filter

Magenta-green-filter

Magenta yarns with green filter

These aren’t good pictures, but the idea is shown. Above are the yarns in their natural state. On the left are shown the two filters. It’s probably obvious which is which.

Greenish-Yarns

Greenish-blue yarns

Below are some greenish/blue/turquoise yarns, even though they don’t look like it in this picture. Even farther down are pictures showing the same yarns with the green and red filters. In theory, these filters are supposed to “remove color”, making it easier to see value among the yarns. The instructions say that for most people, the red filter is best. However, if you are looking at reds, switching to the green filter may be better. And the reverse–looking at greens, the red filter may work best. You be the judge. I think you can also do the same thing with a black and white photo.

Greenish-green-filter

Greenish-blue yarns with green filter

Greenish-red-filter

Greenish-blue yarns with red filter

 

Value

Ruby-Beholder

Ruby Beholder

magenta

Magenta yarns

Yarns-blk-wht

Black and white of the magenta yarns

In a rag weaving workshop, I remember the instructor saying that when you don’t like the colors in a design, it most often is because of value. And that’s the first time I heard of the Ruby Beholder.

Usually you just know if a color doesn’t go with the others, there are other ways to check the value in the colors we choose. I took a black and white photo, thinking of the gray scale, but you can use an actual gray scale finder. Still another way is to use red or green filters. The handy tools come to us mostly from the world of quilters.

Gray Scale

Filters

Gray scale

Gray scale

While looking at my magenta yarns again the other day, I decided to get out the color wheel. When I pulled open the drawer that held it, I found something better, the 3-in-1 tool by Joen Wolfrom.

3-in-1

Color Tool

3-in-1-pages

Color tool contents

This tool has separate pages for lots of colors, from yellow green to aqua green, with all of their variations on little color rectangles on each page, AND there are also two filters, both green and red. If you want to read a bit more, all of the tools can be found on Amazon here.